¿Qué es?

AmeliCA es una infraestructura de comunicación para la publicación académica y la ciencia abierta. Es una iniciativa sostenida de forma cooperativa y centrada en el modelo de publicación sin fines de lucro para conservar la naturaleza académica y abierta de la comunicación científica.

AmeliCA surgió como Conocimiento Abierto para América Latina y el Sur Global, sin embargo, en agosto de 2019 y ante un contexto regional en el cual las plataformas, los consejos nacionales de ciencia, las instituciones académicas y parte de la comunidad académica devalúan la publicación local al alinearse a las estrategias de las editoriales comerciales; y ante un contexto internacional donde iniciativas como el Plan S definen como vía la ciencia abierta, AmeliCA y Redalyc unen fuerzas para fortalecer el modelo de publicación sin fines de lucro para conservar la naturaleza académica y abierta de la comunicación científica (conocido también como modelo diamante), más allá del Sur Global. Este esfuerzo nacido en el Sur y para el Sur, se abre a todas las revistas del mundo que trabajan por un ecosistema de comunicación de la ciencia inclusivo, equitativo y sustentable.

¿Cómo surge?

AmeliCA fue fundada por Eduardo Aguado López y Arianna Becerril García en 2018 como una iniciativa resultado de la experiencia de la Red de Revistas Científicas de América Latina y el Caribe, España y Portugal (Redalyc) para construir un sistema de comunicación para las revistas latinoamericanas y del Sur Global, en respuesta a la crisis de sustentabilidad económica, la falta de reconocimiento ante los sistemas vigentes de evaluación de la ciencia y ante la exclusión de la mayor parte de las revistas de la región, lo cual demanda la formulación de estrategias cooperativas en donde los diversos actores de la comunicación científica apoyen, reconozcan y sostengan el Acceso Abierto.

¿Quiénes somos?

AmeliCA es sostenida por la asociación civil sin fines de lucro “AmeliCA A.C.”. La iniciativa es liderada por la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura (UNESCO), el Consejo Latinoamericano de Ciencias Sociales (CLACSO) y la Red de Revistas Científicas de América Latina, el Caribe, España y Portugal (Redalyc) e impulsada desde su lanzamiento por la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México (UAEM, México), la Universidad de Antioquia (UdeA, Colombia) y la Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP, Argentina). De igual forma, AmeliCA integra en calidad de miembros a instituciones, asociaciones, revistas y personas que apoyan su razón de ser.

Documentación

Publicaciones

Menciones

AfricArxiv. (10 de marzo, 2019). Achieving full Open Access in Africa [Entrada en blog]. Medium.

“Both in Europe and Latin America principles have been postulated to achieve Open Access. Europe calls it Plan S while in Latin America it is known as AmeliCA. Below you find how the two compare to each other.”


Aguado-López, E. & Becerril-García, A. (8 de Agosto de 2019). AmeliCA before Plan S – The Latin American Initiative to develop a cooperative, non-commercial, academic led, system of scholarly communication [Entrada en blog]. LSE Impact Blog.


Aguado-López, E. & Becerril-García, A. (05 de Octubre de 2019). North vs South – Are open access models in conflict? [Mensaje en un blog]. University World News.


Becerril-García, A. (16 de julio de 2019). AmeliCA, Redalyc, and Open Access in Latin America. Open Science MOOC [Módulo 6, Open Access to Research Papers].


Clemente, P. (15 de Mayo de 2019). Open Insights: Entrevista con Arianna Becerril. [Entrada en blog]. Open Library of Humanities.

“Así, AmeliCA surge para que la región cuente con una infraestructura y un marco cooperativo de trabajo que ayude a la publicación científica a seguir en manos de la academia y con una visión claramente definida: no comercial y en contra del sistema preponderante de evaluación de la investigación.”


Becerril-García, A. (10 de enero, 2019). AmeliCA vs Plan S: mismo objetivo, dos estrategias distintas para lograr el acceso abierto [Entrada en blog]. Blog Ameli.

“Existen coincidencias entre las propuestas del Plan S y AmeliCA, como establecer que es necesario realizar pasos decisivos para lograr el Acceso Abierto. Sin embargo, es evidente que la estrategia del Plan S es regulatoria e indicativa, mientras que AmeliCA propone acciones y proyectos en respuesta a las problemáticas a las que se enfrenta la publicación y difusión de la ciencia.”


Becerril-García, A., & Aguado-López, E. (2019). The End of a Centralized Open Access Project and the Beginning of a Community-Based Sustainable Infrastructure for Latin America. En Chan, L. & Mounier (Ed.), Connecting the knowledge commons – from projects to sustainable infrastructure. (41-55) Marsella, Francia: OpenEdition Press.


Kelly, É. (4 de marzo, 2019). Search is on for new steward to deliver Plan S open access, as Smits bows out [Entrada en blog]. Science Business.

“In May, there is a meeting of the Global Research Council in Brazil, with representatives from all the main funders in the world expected to attend. There, Plan S organisers will try to get more agencies to sign up, and discuss terms with a similar open access initiative, Open Knowledge for Latin America and the Global South, known as Amelica.
-We’re reaching out to see if we can join forces. Amelica is 100 per cent compatible with Plan S- Smits said. -If we succeed, it will be an enormous step forward-”


Mudditt, A. (3 de junio, 2019). Plan S and the transformation of scholarly communication: are we missing the woods? [Entrada en blog]. The Scholarly Kitchen.

“ The launch of AmeliCA earlier this year further highlights the growing gulf between the needs of the Global South and the direction of the elite northern research and publishing framework. While Plan S talks about waivers (though has moved away from price caps), a system based on PAR deals will further disenfranchise researchers in the Global South and risks deepening existing inequality and exclusion.”


Nicholson, C. y Owen, J. (21 de febrero, 2019). Global support for Plan S gathers pace [Entrada en blog]. Research.

“In January, Plan S was criticised by Arianna Becerril- Garcia, the president of a similar initiative called Open Knowledge for Latin America and the Global South (Amelica), which was launched in December 2018. She described Plan S as Eurocentric, regulatory and a source of concern for the global south.
But Smits and Becerril-Garcia have now agreed that the two initiatives should try to work together. Becerril-Garcia said that a good starting point would be to discuss the feedback Amelica submitted to Plan S, “where we highlight the importance to propose actions for scholarly-led and community-driven open access”. She said she would invite Smits to meet in Mexico.”


Poynder, R. (21 de mayo, 2019). The OA interviews: Arianna Becerril-García, Chair of AmeliCA. [Entrada de Blog]. Open and Shut?

“What is needed, she says, is to build a “collaborative, non-commercial, sustainable and non-subordinated” system in which control is removed from commercial publishers and handed back to the academy.
The role that AmeliCA and Becerril-García have played in the discussion over Plan S has been important and influential. Interestingly, as the debate has played out, it is not only OA advocates in the South that have been reaching the conclusion that AmeliCA has.”


Poynder, R. (6 de marzo, 2019). Plan S and the Global South-What do countries in the Global South stand to gain from signing up to Europe’s open access strategy? [Entrada en blog]. LSE The Impact Blog.

“In other words, the basis of an alternative strategy is already in place. As a new Latin American initiative called AmeliCA points out, Plan S seeks to regulate commercial agreements, where AmeliCA is focused on “building an infrastructure from and for the academy.”


Poynder, R. (15 de febrero, 2019). Plan S: What strategy now for the Global South? [Entrada en blog]. Richard Poynder.

“Here cOAlition S is only echoing a concern many share, of course, both in the North and the South. As restlessness has grown over the deeply flawed way in which researchers and their works are currently assessed, and the dominance of the pernicious journal hierarchy and impact factor, calls for change have gained considerable traction. Significantly, the “owner” of the impact factor (Clarivate Analytics) recently published a report that “draws attention to the information that is lost when data about researchers and their institutions are squeezed into simplified metrics or a league table.”
To address this a new Latin American initiative called AmeliCA recently put together a multidisciplinary working group of experts from different countries with the aim of generating more relevant and fair metrics for researchers, for journals, and for science.“


Sayer, L. (5 de febrero, 2019). Plan S and Open Access in Latin America: Interview with Dominique Babini [Entrada en blog]. International Science Council.

“Plan S comes at a time when we see growth in non-profit Open Access initiatives, so we have to ask if Plan S is a way of ensuring a predominant role for journals with APCs in the future of Open Access? Is global Open Access about transforming the market from pay-to-read to pay-to-publish, or both during the transition period?
In Latin America we have a different view. Scholarly communications are managed by the scholarly community, with its own journal platforms and repositories, and supported by public funds as part of the public infrastructure needed for research. It is not a market, as is reflected in the short presentation “AmeliCA versus Plan S”
Plan S funders should support these diverse realities”.

Shorish, Y. & Chan, L. (22 de Octubre de 2019). Co-creating Open Infrastructure to Support Epistemic Diversity and Knowledge Equity [Mensaje en un blog]. ScholarLerd.

Taster, M. (24 de octubre de 2019). Open Access Week 2019 – What are we talking about and where are we going? [Mensaje en un blog]. LSE Impact Blog.

“(…) lograr la equidad en el acceso abierto y la investigación requiere de trabajo continuo en muchas dimensiones, desde la macro escala de alcanzar un sistema de investigación abierto que reconoce y alimenta una diversa gama de voces internacionales, hasta la micro escala de desarrollar formas de publicación abierta que en verdad trabajan para las necesidades de diferentes tradiciones de investigación y de aquellos que están deseosos de aprender de ellas. Este post sólo puede abordar la superficie de estos problemas, pero clarifica, no más como lo hace la Semana del Acceso Abierto 2019, que el acceso abierto es un proyecto continuo y a pesar de que sea una realidad para algunos por ahora, necesitamos seguir trabajando para que sea equitativo para todos”.

Tennant, J. (5 de marzo, 2019). Plan S – Time to decide what we stand for [Entrada en blog]. LSE The Impact Blog.

“The consultation process and the wider discussions around Plan S, have also given rise to a number of new questions and my impression is that there are still huge numbers of voices that are not being heard. One particular sticking point in the consultation, were statements made by established western researchers and research organisations along the lines of: ‘Plan S will have a negative impact on junior/global-south/underfunded researchers’. In contrast, EURODOC, perhaps the most representative statement from junior researchers so far on Plan S, shows widespread support for Plan S. The recent launch of AmeliCA in Latin America, also highlights how far behind western understandings and implementations of OA are. These dissenting voices are important as they reveal how centred OA debates are in the global north and amongst an elite group engaged in the scholarly communications industry.”


Tennant, J. (11 de marzo de 2019). Plan S: Achieving Universal Open Access to Research Papers is Becoming Unavoidable [Entrada en blog]. The Wire.

“The consultation process and the wider discussions around Plan S, have also given rise to a number of new questions and my impression is that there are still huge numbers of voices that are not being heard. One particular sticking point in the consultation, were statements made by established western researchers and research organisations along the lines of: ‘Plan S will have a negative impact on junior/global-south/underfunded researchers’. In contrast, EURODOC, perhaps the most representative statement from junior researchers so far on Plan S, shows widespread support for Plan S. The recent launch of AmeliCA in Latin America, also highlights how far behind western understandings and implementations of OA are. These dissenting voices are important as they reveal how centred OA debates are in the global north and amongst an elite group engaged in the scholarly communications industry.”

Tennant, J., Kramer, B. & Ross-Hellauer, T. (17 de Octubre de 2019). Should digital research infrastructure for Open Science be open itself? [Mensaje en un blog]. Open Science Mooc.


UNESCO (12 de abril de 2019). Launch of the Global Alliance of Open Access Scholarly Communication Platforms to democratize knowledge.

“At a session organized by UNESCO on 8th April at the WSIS Forum 2019 in Geneva, coordinators of six platforms – AmeliCA, AJOL, Érudit, J-STAGE, OpenEdition, and SciELO Network agreed to join forces to democratize scientific knowledge following a multicultural, multi-thematic and multi-lingual approach.”

Valenzuela, C. (27 de junio de 2019). En qué consiste AmeliCA, la alternativa de acceso abierto para América Latina [Entrada en blog]. Tipográfica.

“AmeliCA advierte que es importante considerar que la ciencia es una institución global y que, en virtud de esto, las decisiones y acciones que se toman en algún punto del sistema alteran y tienen consecuencias en otras áreas. No vacilan en levantar una bandera en beneficio de una participación más igualitaria, en la que tengan cabida todas las naciones en el discurso científico, con plena conciencia de la diversidad y las diferentes agendas locales para reducir las brechas en el campo de la publicación científica.”